Courses, Subjects, Awards and Programs Policy (MPF1327)

1. Objective

The objectives of this policy are to:

(a)   promote coherent course structures, course rules and clear course completion requirements;

(b)   set clear responsibilities and accountabilities for the development, approval and review of courses and subjects;

(c)    ensure that course and subject learning outcomes (knowledge, skills, and application of knowledge and skills) are apparent for each qualification; and

(d)   meet all relevant national regulatory requirements, including the relevant standards.

2. Scope

This policy applies to all Academic Board approved University award and non-award courses, academic programs and subjects offered by the University.

3. Authority

This policy is made under the University of Melbourne Act 2009 (Vic) and the Academic Board Regulation and supports compliance with the:

(a)   Higher Education Support Act 2003;

(b)   Australian Qualifications Framework (AQF);

(c)   Higher Education Standards Framework 2011;

(d)   Education Services for Overseas Students Act 2000; and

(e)   National Code of Practice for Registration Authorities and Providers of Education and Training to Overseas Students 2007.

4. Policy

Course, program and subject approval

4.1. The Board is responsible for quality assurance of courses including:

(a)   course and subject approval;

(b)   developing, approving and implementing course and subject-related policies, instruments and processes;

(c)    providing, and monitoring the application of, consistent principles in the design, approval, delivery, review, revision, discontinuation, teach-out and suspension of courses, programs and subjects;

(d)   monitoring external accreditation requirements for graduate professional-entry courses; and

(e)   ongoing monitoring and review of courses and subjects.

4.2. Deans initiate and develop new courses and subjects, and course and subject changes.

4.3. The policies and processes for the development, approval and review of academic programs are committed to and guided by the principles of:

(a)   alignment with the University’s strategic plan and academic division plans;

(b)   consistency with Board policy;

(c)   compliance with legislative and regulatory requirements;

(d)   alignment with learning outcomes and graduate attributes;

(e)   consideration of equity and diversity issues in the development of and access to courses, programs and subjects;

(f)    maintenance and assurance of academic standards and quality; and

(g)   regular course and subject reviews.

4.4. The subjects in a course, and the conditions under which those subjects may be taken, are those approved by the Board and published in the Handbook.

Qualification types

4.5. The University offers a range of AQF qualification award and non-AQF award courses, and non-award courses. 

Bachelor degree

4.6. A bachelor degree must meet the requirements of an AQF level 7 qualification and:

(a)   consists of 300 points, with 100 credit points taken at each of first, second- and third-year levels, as specified in each degree’s course rules, unless otherwise approved by the Board;

(b)   requires completion of 50 credit points of study at one year level before proceeding to the next year level, unless otherwise approved by the Board.

(c)   is of three years expected full-time duration;

(d)   includes a major;

(e)   includes a capstone requirement in the major; and

(f)    includes a breadth component, unless exempted by the Board.

4.7. Each bachelor degree has course rules which are published in the Handbook.

4.8. The minimum entry requirement for a bachelor degree course is the Victorian Certificate of Education (VCE) or equivalent. Particular subject area requirements, minimum and specific achievement levels, and English language requirements for each course are approved by the Board and published in the Handbook.

Majors and specialisations in bachelor degrees

4.9. Completion of a major or specialisation is required for completion of a bachelor degree.

4.10. Double majors (the completion of the requirements of two majors) may be undertaken in some bachelor degrees.

4.11. Details of the points required for majors and specialisations in bachelor degrees are specified in the course rules, as detailed in the Handbook.

4.12. Variations to the subject requirements of a particular major for an individual student may be approved by the dean where the variation will not compromise the academic integrity of the major. Changes to the number of points required for a particular major is not permitted.

Minors in bachelor degrees

4.13. Minors comprise 75 credit points of study with 25 credit points at each of first, second and third-year level; or 12.5 points at first-year level, 25 points at second-year level; and 37.5 points at third-year level.

4.14. Minors are not available in all bachelor degrees.

Core component of a bachelor degree

4.15. The core component of the course comprises subjects offered in fields of study encompassed by the bachelor degree, including from designated majors in the course. 

Breadth study in bachelor degrees

4.16. Breadth study must be undertaken in all bachelor degrees except the Bachelor of Agriculture, Bachelor of Fine Arts and Bachelor of Oral Health.

4.17. Subjects may be available as breadth in a particular course where they are outside the fields of study offered within the course core component.

4.18. The breadth requirement forms part of the course rules approved by the Board and is published in the Handbook entry for the course.

4.19. If breadth is required in a bachelor degree, the core component of the course comprises 225 credit points and the breadth component at least 50 credit points. The remaining 25 points may be taken as either core component, breadth, or a combination of core component and breadth.

4.20 Students may take no more than 37.5 points of breadth at level one. 

Capstone in bachelor degrees

4.21. Bachelor degrees must contain a capstone experience which is intended to:

(a)   offer both disciplinary and cohort coherence;

(b)   function as a bridge between the undergraduate experience and the next stage of study or work;

(c)   consolidate the content and skills acquisition components of the major area of study; and

(d)   apply those skills and experience in the capstone.

Bachelor honours programs

4.22. A Bachelor honours program must meet the requirements of an AQF level 8 qualification. I

4.23. A Bachelor honours program is:

(a)   an additional 100 point program taken after the completion of a 300-point bachelor degree course which builds on the major taken in the bachelor degree; and

(b)   of one year expected full-time duration.

4.24. No more than 25 credit points of a bachelor honours program may be taken at the third-year level, and none may be at a lower level than third-year.

4.25. Bachelor honours programs must include a research subject of 25 credit points or more (dissertation, minor thesis or research project).

4.26. The Board-approved entry requirements for bachelor honours programs are published in the Handbook.

4.27. A bachelor (degree with honours) can only be awarded when:

(a)   a student has completed all components of the honours program in accordance with the course rules; and

(b)   the examiners certify that the student has been awarded first, second or third-class honours.

Diplomas

4.28. Diplomas meet the requirements of an AQF level 5 qualification. Concurrent diplomas can only be undertaken concurrently with a bachelor degree course, except for the Diploma in Languages, unless otherwise approved by the dean.

4.29. Diplomas are:

(a)   a 100-credit point program taken in an area of study different to that which the student is undertaking as part of a bachelor degree; and

(b)   of one year expected full-time duration.

4.30. Up to 50 credit points of studies may be cross-credited between a bachelor degree and a concurrent diploma.

Associate degrees

4.31. Associate degrees must meet the requirements of an AQF level 6 qualification.

4.32. An associate degree consists of 200 credit points of study, with 100 credit points taken at each of first and second-year levels, and is of two years expected full-time duration, unless otherwise approved by the Board.

4.33. Associate degrees may be designed to allow students to articulate into a bachelor degree course in a cognate area of study with maximum credit of 200 points. All other provisions of the Credit, Advanced Standing and Accelerated Entry Policy apply.

4.34. The minimum entry requirement for an associate degree course is the VCE or equivalent. Particular subject area requirements and minimum achievement levels for entry to each course are approved by the Board and published in the Handbook.

Advanced diplomas

4.35. Advanced diplomas must meet the requirements of an AQF level 6 qualification.

4.36. An advanced diploma consists of 150 or 200 credit points, with 100 credit points taken at the first year level and 50 or 100 credit points taken at the second-year level, and is of up to two years expected full-time duration, unless otherwise approved by the Board.

4.37. Advanced diplomas may be designed to allow students to articulate into a bachelor degree course in a cognate area of study with a maximum credit equal to the credit points of the advanced diploma. All other provisions of the Credit, Advanced Standing and Accelerated Entry Policy apply.

4.38. The minimum entry requirement for an advanced diploma is the VCE or equivalent. Particular subject area requirements and minimum achievement levels for entry to each course are approved by the Board and published in the Handbook.

Graduate certificates

4.39. Graduate certificates must meet the requirements of AQF level 8 qualifications.

4.40. Graduate certificates consist of 50 credit points and are of six months expected full-time duration unless otherwise approved by the Board.

4.41. The minimum entry requirement is a pass-level undergraduate degree or equivalent, or a minimum of five years documented, relevant work experience.

4.42. The Board may approve additional or higher level entry requirements for each course.

4.43. Substantial documented, relevant professional experience at a high level may be considered equivalent to an undergraduate degree.

4.44. Graduate certificates must contain a minimum of 12.5 credit points of graduate level subjects; and, must provide a coherent academic program appropriate for graduates.

4.45. Where a graduate certificate offered in a discipline or field of study:

(a)   is designed to provide graduates with the opportunity to extend their studies by taking primarily fourth year level subjects in the discipline or field of study undertaken in their undergraduate study; and

(b)   there is a graduate certificate in the discipline or field of study for students with no or lower levels of required cognate knowledge on entry;

the graduate-level certificate is titled Graduate Certificate in [discipline/field of study] (Advanced).

4.46. Where the dean makes a compelling argument for varying the circumstances for use of the title Graduate Certificate (Advanced), for example, because of local, national or international practice, the Board may approve that variation.

Graduate diplomas

4.47. Graduate diplomas must meet the requirements of AQF level 8 qualifications.

4.48. Graduate diplomas consist of 100 credit points and are of one year expected full-time duration unless otherwise approved by the Board

4.49. The minimum entry requirement to be considered for selection to a graduate diploma course is a pass-level undergraduate degree or equivalent, or a minimum of five years documented, relevant work experience.

4.50. The Board may approve additional or higher level entry requirements for each course.

4.51. Substantial relevant, documented professional experience at a high level may be considered equivalent to an undergraduate degree.

4.52. Graduate diplomas must contain a minimum of 25 credit points of graduate level subjects and must provide a coherent academic program appropriate for graduates.

4.53. Where:

(a) a graduate diploma is designed to provide graduates with the opportunity to extend their studies by taking primarily bachelor honours subjects in the discipline or field of study of their undergraduate degree, and

(b) there is a graduate diploma in the discipline or field of study for students with no or lower levels of required cognate knowledge on entry,

the graduate-level diploma is titled Graduate Diploma in [discipline/field of study] (Advanced).

4.54. Where the dean makes a compelling argument for varying the circumstances for use of the title Graduate Diploma (Advanced), for example, because of local, national or international practice, the Board may approve that variation.

Master degree (coursework)

4.55. A master degree (coursework) courses meets the requirements of an AQF level 9 qualification.

4.56. Master degree (coursework) courses may consist of:

(a)   100 credit points, one year expected full-time duration;

(b)   150 credit points, one year and six months expected full-time duration;

(c)    200 credit points, two years expected full-time duration; or,

(d)   more than 200 credit points, with a corresponding expected full-time duration.

4.57. A master degree (coursework) course of 200 points or more may be comprised of 100 credit point of subjects at in accordance with the rules for graduate certificates and graduate diplomas, if taken in the first year and the final 100 credit points of a master degree (coursework) course must be at master level.

4.58. The minimum entry requirement for 100-point master degree (coursework) course is:

(a)   a bachelor honours degree or equivalent in a cognate area;

(b)   a three-year undergraduate qualification and at least 50 credit points, or equivalent, of graduate study in a cognate area;

(c)   a three-year undergraduate qualification in a cognate area and at least two years of documented, relevant work experience; or

(d)   a minimum of eight years documented, relevant work experience.

4.59. The minimum entry requirement for 150-point master degree (coursework) course is:

(a)   a bachelor degree or equivalent in a cognate area; 

(b)   bachelor honours degree or equivalent in a non-cognate area;

(c)   a three-year undergraduate qualification and at least 50 credit points, or equivalent, of graduate study in a non-cognate area;

(d)   a three-year undergraduate qualification in a non-cognate area and at least two years of documented, relevant work experience; or

(e)   a minimum of six years documented, relevant work experience.

4.60. The minimum entry requirement for 200-point master degree (coursework) course is a bachelor degree or equivalent in a non-cognate area, or a minimum of six years documented, relevant professional work experience.

4.61. Where professional work experience is an element of the entry requirements, the experience must be relevant, fully documented and have been obtained prior to admission to the course. All master degree (coursework) courses must offer:

(a)   at least one defined capstone experience, of at least 25 credit points, completed towards the end of the degree; and

(b)   a research pathway (which may be compulsory or optional) of at least 25 points to enable eligibility for a graduate research course at the University. The Board may grant an exemption from the research pathway requirement.

4.62. Maximum exemption granted from compulsory subjects in a 200 point master degree (coursework) due to having completed similar material in their undergraduate course is 50 credit points. Exemptions can only be granted where completion of similar material at a standard equivalent to the requirements of the master degree subject can be demonstrated to the satisfaction of the relevant dean.

4.63. If the first part of a master degree course can be awarded as a graduate certificate or diploma (an exit award), the graduate certificate/diploma course must be approved as a separate course. 

Master Degree (extended)

4.64. Master degree (extended) courses meet the requirements of an AQF level 9 qualification and must:

(a)   consist of at least 300 points of study ( three years expected full-time duration); and,

(b)   meet professional accreditation requirements..

4.65. The minimum entry requirements for a master degree (extended) course is an undergraduate degree. The following may also be required:

(a)   preliminary studies in related disciplines; and

(b)   academic achievement at a specified level.

4.66. A master degree (extended) may use the degree nomenclature of ‘Doctor’ where it is consistent with the AQF as follows:

(a)   the use of the title “Juris Doctor” is permitted for a master degree (extended) where the degree qualifies a graduate for legal practice.

(b)   the use of the title “Doctor of ...” is permitted for a master degree (extended) for five professions: medical practice; physiotherapy; dentistry; optometry and veterinary practice.

4.67. All subjects in a master degree (extended) course must be at graduate level; AQF levels 8, 9 or 10. 

Master degree "with distinction"

4.68. The Board may approve the awarding of master degrees “with distinction” where an average of First Class Honours (H1) across the studies in the master degree course has been achieved.

4.69. Other requirements for awarding a master degree “with distinction” may be approved by the Board via the course approval instrument.

Doctoral degree courses - professional

4.70. Doctoral degree (professional) courses:

(a)   meet the requirements of an AQF level 10 qualification;

(b)   are built around original and significant research that makes a major contribution to knowledge for the discipline or for professional practice;

(c)    consist of coursework and a research component; and

(d)   consist of at least 400 credit points; 4 years expected full-time duration.

4.71. At least two full-time years or equivalent (half the EFTSL) of a doctoral degree (professional) course is a coherent program of research and scholarship with the remaining 200 credit points (of two years full-time or equivalent) made up of coursework.

4.72. The entry requirements for a doctoral degree (professional) course are:

(a)   a master degree or a bachelor honours degree (H1 or H2A or equivalent) in a relevant discipline; or

(b)   demonstrated capacity to undertake significant research in the proposed doctoral field evidenced through research training, previous study, advanced professional practice, professional publications or creative achievements; or

(c)    a minimum of 10 years’ documented, relevant professional practice.

4.73. A maximum of 100 points of coursework subjects in professional doctorates can be at master level (AQF level 9). Additional coursework subjects must be at doctoral level, AQF level 10, and available only to doctoral degree course students.

Research Degrees - Master Degree (Research)

4.74. Master degree (research) courses must meet the requirements of an AQF level 9 qualification.

4.75. The minimum entry requirements for a master degree (research) are published with the resolutions of the Board on minimum entry requirements and is usually:

(a)   the completion of an undergraduate qualification equivalent to 400 credit points, four years full-time duration, which includes a substantial research component equivalent to at least 25% of one year of full-time study, in a relevant discipline at a specified standard of achievement; or

(b)   a qualification and professional experience considered to be equivalent;

any further requirements for particular courses are approved by the Board and published with the course details in the Handbook.

4.76. A master degree (research) course consists of a coherent program of study:

(a)   designed to achieve outcomes appropriate to at least 1.5 years of full-time study beyond an AQF level 7 qualification; and

(b)   comprising supervised study and research of which at least two thirds will be devoted to research.

4.77. Materials for assessment may comprise a thesis or its creative equivalent, a combination of coursework and thesis, or thesis with creative works.

4.78. Coursework subjects in a master degree (research) must be at master level.

4.79. Candidates in master degree (research) may transfer to a doctoral program:

(a)   if they meet the minimum entry requirements for the doctorate;

(b)   if they can demonstrate the viability of their work to fulfil doctoral outcomes;

(c)    if they have successfully completed any conversion conditions;

(d)   where appropriate supervision and resources are available;

(e)   with the approval of the relevant dean.

4.80. Except where 4.79 applies, an unfinished master degree (research), or other doctorate, is not considered in assessing eligibility for admission into a doctoral degree (research).

Research Degrees - Doctoral Degree (Research)

4.81. Doctoral degree (research) courses must meet the requirements of an AQF level 10 qualification and:

(a)   consist of a coherent program of research and scholarship, investigating a significant issue in a way that makes an original contribution to the discipline; and

(b)   comprise supervised study and research of which at least two thirds is devoted to research.

4.82. The minimum entry requirements for a doctoral degree (research) course are:

(a)   the completion of an undergraduate qualification or equivalent to 400 credit points, four years full-time duration, which includes a substantial research component equivalent to at least 25% of one year of full-time study, in a relevant discipline at a specified standard of achievement; or

(b)   a master degree (research) with a prescribed achievement level;

(c)   a master degree coursework with a prescribed achievement level in a research component; or

(d)   a qualification and professional experience considered to be equivalent.

4.83. Individual course entry requirements are published in the Handbook.

4.84. The materials required for assessment is a thesis, but may also comprise a combination of advanced coursework and thesis, or thesis with creative works.

4.85. Doctoral degree (research) courses with compulsory coursework may include a progression requirement of a certain level of achievement (e.g. H2A average) for the candidate to progress from probationary candidature to confirmed candidature.

4.86. Coursework subjects that form part of the assessed requirements of doctoral degrees (research) must be at master or doctorate level.

Research Degrees - Higher Doctorates

4.87. Higher Doctorates are awarded on the basis of an internationally recognised sustained original contribution to a field of knowledge and research over and above the requirements of a doctoral degree (research).

4.88. Higher Doctorates and the conditions and requirements of the awards are approved and published by the Board. 

Non-AQF Award Courses - Professional certificate courses

4.89. Professional certificates are non-AQF awards of the University which are designed for professionals to gain foundational knowledge in a specific area.

4.90. Professional certificate courses consist of 25 credit points of study (0.25 EFTSL) unless otherwise approved by the Board.

4.91. The entry requirements for a professional certificate course are:

(a)   an undergraduate degree or equivalent; or,

(b)   professional experience of at least 5 years of full-time documented relevant work experience.

4.92. Subjects in a professional certificate course are at graduate certificate/diploma level.

4.93. Professional certificates may be stand-alone awards or may be part of an articulated suite of courses providing students with a pathway to a graduate certificate or master degree (coursework) at the University.

Non-AQF Award Courses - Specialist certificate courses

4.94. Specialist certificates are awards of the University and are non-AQF awards which provide study at master level and extend skills and knowledge in an academic or professional area previously studied.

4.95. Specialist certificate courses consist of 25 credit points of study (0.25 EFTSL) unless otherwise approved by the Board.

4.96. The entry requirements for a specialist certificate course are:

(a)   an undergraduate degree in an appropriate discipline or equivalent; or,

(b)   at least seven years of documented relevant work experience and demonstrated evidence of written and analytical skills appropriate for postgraduate study.

4.97. Subjects in a specialist certificate course are equivalent to master level subjects.

4.98. A specialist certificate may be a stand-alone award or part of an articulated suite of awards leading to a master degree.

Other Course Matters - Nested Courses

4.99. The Board may approve courses with nested sub-courses, to enable multiple entry and exit points.

4.100. Courses in nested programs may be established as exit only awards, where a student enrolled in the higher award course may choose to exit the course and take the award for one of the lesser qualifications if they have satisfied all requirements of the lesser qualification.

4.101. Minimum requirements for completion are set for each exit point in a nested program.

4.102. Each award in a nested program may be taken out upon meeting the requirements for the award.

4.103. A required standard of performance may be required to progress from one stage of the nested program to the next stage.

4.104. Credit can be granted for subjects undertaken in a nested award toward another University course, whether or not the award was conferred, subject to the limitations for the granting of credit prescribed in the Credit, Advanced Standing and Accelerated Entry Policy.

4.105. The following progression rules and entry requirements apply to nested graduate courses:

(a)   If there are no internal progression requirements regarding levels of performance from the lower level to the higher level qualification, the entry requirements for all the AQF level qualifications must be the same.

(b)   Where progression from one level qualification to the next requires a prescribed level of performance, students admitted directly to the higher level must have met the same requirement on entry.

(c)    Where the entry requirements for the lower level qualification differ to the higher level qualification because special background knowledge (e.g. professional experience, research training) is required to undertake the higher level qualification, all students must have met the specified background knowledge requirement to enter the higher level. 

Other Course Matters - Articulated courses

4.106. Articulation arrangements between courses may be between undergraduate courses, graduate courses or from an undergraduate to a graduate course, both within the University, or from other tertiary institutions.

4.107. Credit in articulated courses is granted in accordance with the Credit, Advanced Standing and Accelerated Entry Policy.

4.108. Where courses allow articulation from an undergraduate to a graduate course, the graduate part of the course must meet the relevant graduate course structure requirements of this policy.

4.109. In articulated arrangements students may meet the entry requirements through studies in the first course. This does not preclude the Board from approving academic achievement levels to progress from one course to the next, or from approving additional entry requirements for the second course .

Other Course Matters - Progression rules

4.110. The Board may approve progression rules for a single course or suite of courses.

4.111. Where the Board has approved progression rules those rules must be published with the course details in the Handbook.

4.112. Progression rules may specify:

(a)   the number of credit points or particular subjects which must be completed at each year level of the course before proceeding to the next year level;

(b)   a level of academic achievement required to move from one year of a course to the next;

(c)    a level of academic achievement to move from a lower qualification to a higher qualification in nested courses or to articulate from one course to another.

Other Course Matters - Combined degrees (double degrees)

4.113. Combined degrees are permitted in graduate courses, but are not permitted in undergraduate courses.

4.114. Combined degrees:

(a)   may vary in duration;

(b)   allow study toward two degrees at the same time;

(c)    may include cross-crediting arrangements;

(d)   may be studied jointly, but in some cases studies may follow one after the other or studies in the degrees may alternate year by year; and

(e)   may require more than the standard full-time study load. 

Other Course Matters - Sequential degrees

4.115. Sequential degrees are two courses at the same AQF qualification level taken in sequence with cross-crediting arrangements.

4.116. Entry into the first course is in accordance with the published entry requirements. Entry into the second course is dependent on the applicant meeting the entry requirements for the second course through prior studies or from studies in the first course.

4.117. Sequential bachelor degree courses are structured as follows:

(a)   the first course is completed with 300 credit points (3 years) and the second with a subsequent 200 credit points (2 years), with up to 100 points cross-credited from the first course consisting largely of breath studies undertaken in the first; and

(b)   credit may be given for core subjects where appropriate, but the second bachelor degree course consists primarily of core subjects and breadth is not available unless otherwise approved by the Board; and

(c)    completion of a major is required both courses.

Other Course Matters - Joint research degrees

4.118. A joint research degree course is a degree course designed, developed and delivered collaboratively by the University and another institution, resulting in a single award.

4.119. Joint research degrees must have common course objectives and learning outcomes with a specified amount of the program assigned to each institution.

4.120. Rules of assessment, academic misconduct and student appeals, and academic progress are determined in accordance with the regulations and policies of the institution administering the assessment for the relevant part of the program.

4.121. Rules of academic progress are determined in accordance with the regulations and policies of the home institution.

Other Course Matters - Joint coursework courses

4.122. A joint coursework course is a single course designed, developed and taught collaboratively by the University and another institution, resulting in a single award.

4.123. Joint coursework courses must have an integrated cohesive curriculum based on common course objectives and learning outcomes with a specified amount of the content delivered by each institution.

4.124. Rules of assessment for individual subjects, including provisions relating to special consideration, academic misconduct and student appeals, are determined in accordance with the regulations and policies of the institution administering the assessment for that subject.

4.125. Rules of academic progress in the course are determined in accordance with the regulations and policies of the home institution.

Other Course Matters - Dual courses

4.126. A dual course is program of study taught by more than one institution and resulting in more than one award, one from each institution, as a result of formal cross-crediting arrangements.

4.127. Students complete the compulsory components of the University of Melbourne award at the University of Melbourne, unless a special case is made for other arrangements.

4.128. Rules of assessment for individual subjects, including provisions relating to special consideration, academic misconduct and student appeals, are determined in accordance with the regulations and policies of the institution administering the assessment for that subject.

4.129. Rules of academic progress in the course are determined in accordance with the regulations and policies of the home institution.

Other Course Matters - Non-Award Study

4.130. The Board may approve foundation studies programs as pathways into award courses. Foundation studies programs are non-award courses which are approved in the same way as award courses.

4.131. Single-subject study is available through the following non-award programs, subject to provisions 4.132 and 4.133:

(a)   Community Access Program (CAP) study (assessed or non-assessed mode);

(b)   enabling study (assessed mode);

(c)    bridging study for overseas trained professionals (assessed mode); and

(d)   incoming cross-institutional study and incoming study abroad (assessed mode).

4.132. The relevant dean determines the availability of individual subjects through non-award study.

4.133. The relevant dean determines whether an applicant for non-award study is admitted to a particular subject, and whether the applicant is permitted to enrol in assessed or non-assessed mode.

4.134. Persons undertaking non-award study are students of the University.

Other Course Matters - Course objectives, learning outcomes and graduate attributes

4.135. All course descriptions and Handbook entries must include statements of course objectives and learning outcomes which address the types of skills and knowledge students are expected to acquire in the course.

4.136. Course objectives and learning outcomes are approved in the course accreditation instrument, and through any subsequent changes, are accredited or approved by the Board.

4.137. Course objectives must cover both specific and generic learning outcomes and must be designed, at a minimum, to be consistent with students acquiring the relevant AQF learning outcomes (knowledge, skills, and application of knowledge and skills) as set out in the criteria and descriptors for the relevant qualification type and to assist students to meet the course graduate attributes.

4.138. Course coherence is demonstrated by clarity of the learning outcomes, the way in which each element in the program contributes to them, and how the learning outcomes enable students to achieve the course graduate attributes.

Other Course Matters - Core participation requirements

4.139. All courses and subjects contain statements about core participation requirements. In enrolling in the course or subject, the student declares that they are able to meet those requirements, allowing for any reasonable adjustments that the dean may make. 

Other Course Matters - Professional Placements

4.140. Deans may only facilitate placements or internships for students where the host organisation and details of the arrangement comply with the requirements of the Fair Work Act. An Agreement must be in place with the host organisation, along with relevant insurance. Where relevant, arrangements must also comply with the Student Travel and Transport Policy.

Subjects - Subjects and Credit Points

4.141. Credit points are assigned to courses such that one year of full-time study equals 100 credit points.

4.142. Individual subjects are usually worth 12.5 credit points or multiples thereof.

4.143. A subject available in more than one course has the same credit point value irrespective of the course in which it is available.

4.144. Zero credit points subjects may only be created where

(a)   the work undertaken by the student is not at the University (viz. students undertaking work experience in industry). Zero credit point units are only permitted for the establishment of work experience in industry units where fee assessment of the student would be inappropriate due to minimal University resources being committed to the experience.

(b)   the student is undertaking a joint research degree program and is at that time located at and consuming the resources of the partner institution;

(c)    as a required element of a graduate research degree program;

(d)   an activity has to be undertaken by a student as a compulsory prerequisite to undertake a future coursework, load bearing unit (e.g. hurdle requirements); or

(e)   the subject is established to allow the recording and approval of an overall grade for a course or group of subjects.

4.145. The credit point value of a subject indicates the amount of work required for satisfactory completion of that subject.

4.146. The total time commitment to study for a 12.5 point subject is generally 170 hours. Acceptable variations to the total time commitment are in the range of ± 20% which includes:

(a)   teaching and non-teaching periods such as the mid-semester break;

(b)   preparatory time leading up to the final examination/assessment; and

(c)    the final examination period.

4.147. Included in the calculation of time commitment are:

(a)   contact hours;

(b)   reading and preparatory work;

(c)    private study; and

(d)   preparation for assessment.

4.148. Subject contact hours may be preceded by a period where students are required to complete reading and other preparatory work.

Subjects - Subject level

4.149. Each subject is offered at a particular level in a course. The level of offer indicates the general level of assumed background knowledge and prior skill acquisition. As subjects at different levels have qualitatively different learning outcomes, subjects must not be offered at multiple levels. 

Subjects - Prerequisites and co-requisites

4.150. Prerequisites and co-requisites for subjects are set on the basis of academic consideration of the knowledge required to be able to fully achieve the objectives of the subject.

4.151. A dean may grant advanced standing or exemption from prerequisites and/or co-requisites for a subject on the basis of knowledge or studies considered equivalent to the relevant requisite in accordance with the Credit, Advanced Standing and Accelerated entry Policy.

4.152. A prerequisite may have minimum academic achievement standards which must be achieved for a student to be able to progress to the next level.

Subjects - Disallowed subject combinations

4.153. Disallowed subject combinations may be set where subjects have content that is substantially similar to other subjects, such that achieving a pass in the first subject precludes a student from receiving credit for completion of the second subject where they have previously received credit for the first subject within the same course.

Subjects - Additional entry requirements for subjects

4.154. The dean may set additional entry requirements for a subject that must be met prior to enrolment in that subject (e.g. music subjects may require students to complete an audition). These are published in the Handbook.

Subjects - Responsibility for subjects

4.155. The dean must appoint an academic staff member to coordinate each subject who has overall responsibility for the planning and delivery of that subject including ensuring that the subject outline and subject materials are available to students at the commencement of the teaching period for that subject. These may be provided in hard copy but must also be made available on the student learning management system (LMS).

Subjects - University breadth subjects

4.156. University breadth subjects may be taken as part of the breadth requirement in a bachelor degree.

4.157. University breadth subjects are designed to:

(a)   address an issue or phenomenon of major significance, that can be illuminated by bringing to bear different disciplinary perspectives;

(b)   incorporate and integrate three or more disciplinary perspectives that are clearly distinct, centrally relevant and each given importance without allowing any one to dominate; and

(c)    represent each of the domains of the sciences, social sciences, and the humanities, unless otherwise approved by the Board.

4.158. The different disciplines must be apparent in all aspects of curriculum, teaching and assessment for the subject.

4.159. No faculty will have input greater than 50% to the subject and each faculty making a substantial contribution must contribute at least 20% to the subject.

Subjects - Subject objectives and learning outcomes

4.160. All subject outlines must include statements of subject objectives and learning outcomes which address the types of skills and knowledge students are expected to acquire in the subject.

4.161. Subject objectives and learning outcomes are approved by the Board in the subject approval instrument.

4.162. The available combination of subjects within a course must ensure that all course objectives and learning outcomes are addressed. Subjects designed to build a major sequence must be designed in a complementary fashion to ensure that all intended learning outcomes for that particular area of study are addressed.

Subjects - Subject quotas

4.163. Subject quotas must not restrict the capacity of a student to complete all compulsory subjects required for the completion of their course, or any core subjects required for the completion of their enrolled major.

4.164. The imposition of a quota or decrease (reduction in the number of places) to a subject quota in undergraduate subjects that are compulsory in a course or core to a major must be approved by the Board.

4.165. A dean may approve subject quotas in any subjects for which they are responsible that are not covered by 4.164.

4.166. A dean may remove a subject quota in a subject for which they are responsible at any time.

4.167. Subject quotas, and the method of selection, must be included in the subject entry in the Handbook.

Expected course duration and maximum time to complete

4.168. Except as otherwise provided in this or other University policies and subject to Commonwealth and State regulatory requirements, a student must complete a course within the expected course duration period.

4.169. The maximum time to complete a coursework course is calculated based on the expected course duration and includes any periods of leave of absence or approved study at other institutions for credit towards a course. It is calculated as follows:

(a)   for coursework courses available as full-time only: n + 2 years, where n = expected full-time expected course duration; or

(b)   for coursework courses available as full-time or part-time: 2n + 2 years, where n = expected full-time duration of the course.

4.170. A dean may extend the maximum time to complete a coursework course by up to one year in exceptional circumstances.

4.171. This policy does not restrict the Board specifying a shorter maximum time to complete or shorter expected course duration for a course in the course approval instrument.

4.172. Students taking a concurrent diploma have an additional year added to the expected full-time course duration of the bachelor degree.

Award Nomenclature and Abbreviations

4.173. Award titles must:

(a)   specify the type of award (bachelor, master, graduate diploma, etc.);

(b)   accurately represent the program content;

(c)   be concise and meaningful;

(d)   be consistent with national, international and professional standards and usage;

(e)   include the area of study, which may be reflected through a generic title (e.g. Bachelor of Arts), or a specific title (e.g. Master of Management (Business Analysis Systems); and

(f)    for relevant degrees, whether it was awarded with honours or distinction, e.g. Bachelor of Science (Degree with Honours), or distinction e.g. Master of Engineering (with Distinction).

4.174. The following protocols must be observed when determining award abbreviations:

(a)   abbreviations and acronyms must be meaningful, easily recognisable, free from possible negative connotations and as short as possible;

(b)   abbreviations must be consistent within the area of study (e.g. within science programs, ‘Science’ must always be abbreviated as ‘Sc’);

(c)   an abbreviation for a single discipline/field of study must not exceed six characters;

(d)   duplication of the same abbreviated form for unrelated disciplines must be avoided wherever possible;

(e)   accepted international form should be used where possible;

(f)    spaces (e.g. BSc not B Sc) or punctuation marks (including full stops, slashes, dashes, etc) are not to be inserted between the letters;

(g)    the first letter of each abbreviated word should be capitalised; and

(h)   an abbreviated form of the name of the university or institution that conferred the award may be placed after the award abbreviation in italics.

4.175. Where a dean wants an exemption from these protocols, a case must be put to the relevant Board committee.

4.176. Except where the Board has granted an exemption, award types are abbreviated as follows:

Award Type

Abbreviation

Example

Certificate

Cert

U21 Certificate in Global Issues
U21CertGlobIss

Specialist Certificate

SpecCert

Specialist Certificate in Palliative Care
SpecCertPallCare

Professional Certificate

ProfCert

Professional Certificate in Understanding Development
ProfCertUndDevt

Graduate Certificate

GCert

Graduate Certificate in Engineering (Environmental Engineering)
GCertEng(EnvEng)

Graduate Certificate (Advanced)

GCert(Adv)

Postgraduate Certificate in Environment
GCertEnv(Adv)

Advanced Diploma

AdvDip

Advanced Diploma in Agriculture
AdvDip(Agr)

Diploma

Dip

Diploma in Music
DipMus

Graduate Diploma

GDip

Graduate Diploma in Professional Accounting
GDipProfAcc

Graduate Diploma (Advanced)

GDip(Adv)

Graduate Diploma in Arts
GDipArts(Adv)

Associate Degree

AssocDeg

Associate Degree in Environmental Horticulture

AssocDegEnvHort

Bachelor

B

Bachelor of Commerce
BCom

Master

M

Master of Teaching
MTeach

Doctor

D

Doctor of Music
DMus

Doctor of Philosophy
PhD

Degree with Honours

(Hons)

Bachelor of Arts (Degree with Honours)
BA(Hons)

Degree with Distinction

(Distinct)

Master of Engineering (with Distinction)

ME(Distinct)

4.177. The convention for ordering qualifications after a person’s name is:

(a)   lower qualification type precedes the higher qualification type, e.g. BE, MSc Melb;

(b)   all degrees from each institution are grouped, e.g. BSc Melb, MA, DipA RMIT

(c)   graduate diplomas and certificates are placed after degrees e.g. BCom, MBA Melb, DipEd Latrobe; and

(d)   professional qualifications are placed after academic qualifications, e.g. BEng, PhD Melb, FIEAust.

Course completion

4.178. An award is only conferred when the relevant dean certifies that a student has completed all academic course requirements.

4.179. Notwithstanding 4.178 the President of the Board, on the recommendation of the relevant dean, may waive the completion requirements and allow a student to be admitted to one of the following awards:

(a)   Bachelor;

(b)   Diploma;

(c)   Associate Degree;

(d)   Advanced Diploma;

(e)   Graduate Diploma;

(f)    Graduate Certificate; or

(g)   Masters degree (coursework)

4.180. For the avoidance of doubt, the President of the Board may not waive the completion requirements for the following award courses:

(a)   Bachelor (degree with honours);

(b)   Masters degree (extended);

(c)   Masters degree (research);

(d)   Doctoral degrees;

(e)   Professional Certificates; and

(f)    Specialist Certificates.

4.181. Students undertaking a bachelor degree with a concurrent diploma must complete the requirements of both courses to be able to graduate with either award.

4.182. A student who has completed the requirements of the bachelor degree may be permitted to continue the diploma course concurrently with a graduate course in accordance with the Enrolment and Timetabling Policy’s rules on overload and with the permission of the relevant deans.

Correction of completion errors in student records

4.183. The President of the Board must approve correction of errors in course completions.

Academic transcripts

4.184. The Academic Registrar issues one academic transcript as a complete record of all award and non-award studies that a student has undertaken at the University at the conclusion of enrolment.

Australian Higher Education Graduation Statement (AHEGS)

4.185. The Academic Registrar issues one AHEGS for each award conferred, upon conferral of the award.

4.186. Where course requirements change and award descriptor information is consequentially amended, the amended award descriptor applies only to AHEGS issued to students completing and having the award subsequently conferred under the new course requirements. 

Testamurs

4.187. The Academic Registrar issues one testamur to each student who has had their award conferred by Council.

4.188. Testamurs for joint awards and dual awards are issued in accordance with the agreement between the two contributing institutions.

Academic transcript and AHEGS - inclusion of other information

4.189. All academic student awards (including prizes and scholarships) approved by the Board are included on the academic transcript and AHEGS.

4.190. The Board may approve additional student achievements for inclusion on the academic transcript and AHEGS in accordance with the rules published on the Board’s Course Approval and Management Procedures (CAMP). 

Security of academic transcripts, AHEGS and testamurs

4.191. All academic transcripts, AHEGS and testamurs include one or more security features to authenticate the document to minimise the risk of fraudulent use. 

5. Procedural principles

Accreditation and approval of courses

5.1. The Board approves new courses, changes to courses, and subjects through the accreditation instrument.

5.2. The accreditation instrument for University accredited award courses includes:

(a)   a course title and abbreviation;

(b)   course learning outcomes and a demonstration of how these align with the requirements of the Australian Qualifications Framework;

(c)   details of total volume of learning expressed as EFTSL, and total expected duration of the course;

(d)   the purpose of the course and expected graduate attributes;

(e)   course structure and rules;

(f)    details of majors, minors and specialisations, where relevant, and how these align with the course leaning outcomes;

(g)   details of subjects, including subject learning outcomes and how these align with the course (or major or specialisation) learning outcomes, requisites, key generic skills, content and assessment structures;

(h)   minimum entry requirements, including English language requirements

(i)    where appropriate, in graduate courses, a statement of any variations to standard academic progress requirements and consequences;

(j)     progression rules in courses;

(k)    mode of delivery: face-to-face, blended, workplace, offshore;

(l)     location of delivery;

(m)   details of relevant external reference points or standards, including any relevant professional body requirements and professional accreditation;

(n)   details of any approved credit transfer arrangements and/or pathways into the course or requests to approve credit transfer arrangements or pathways; and

(o)   details of any pathways from the course to another University course.

5.3. The following additional matters are included in the accreditation instrument for dual courses:

(a)   the letter of support from the proposed partner institution; and

(b)   documentation confirming the following:

i. the process for applying for the dual course will be clearly advertised to students;

ii. the criteria for selection into the dual course and details of how the selection process will be managed;

iii. how students will meet the requirements of the University of Melbourne award, including details of any cross-credit arrangements and how this complies with the limitations on credit established in the Credit, Advanced standing and Accelerated Entry Policy;

iv. a clear statement of the obligations and responsibilities of each institution have, including rights and responsibilities to discontinue the dual program and an acknowledgement that both institutions will honour their obligations to existing students following the discontinuation of any program;

v. the process by which changes to academic components of the program are reviewed to ensure that academic standards are maintained;

vi. the course delivery mode(s), details of subjects or units of study, language(s) of instruction (if applicable); and

vii. how intellectual property issues will be managed.

5.4. The following additional requirements are included in the accreditation instrument for joint coursework courses, and joint research degrees where relevant:

(a)   the letter of support from the proposed partner institutions; and

(b)   documentation confirming the following:

i. that partner institutions have adopted effective and consistent procedures for delivery of subjects and monitoring of student progress;

ii. the program has been designed, and will be monitored, taught and examined, in an integrated way at the participating institutions;

iii. the program is intellectually coherent and its proposed structure is organised into a cohesive curriculum based on common course objectives and learning outcomes;

iv. the mechanism by which individual subject grades obtained by students at each participating institution will be translated into an agreed common grading structure and used in the overall honours calculation for the program (the latter where relevant);

v. the criteria for selection into the program and details of how the selection process will be managed;

vi. established criteria for assessment, as well as procedures for reviewing or appealing against assessment outcomes, which are made clear and transparent to students;

vii. the obligations and responsibilities of each institution, including rights and responsibilities to discontinue the program and an acknowledgement that both institutions will honour their obligations to students following the discontinuation of any program;

viii. the process by which changes to academic components of the course will be reviewed to ensure that academic standards are maintained;

ix. the course delivery mode(s), details of subjects or units of study, and language(s) of instruction;

x. how intellectual property issues will be managed;

xi. appropriate advanced standing (credit) arrangements; and

xii. identification of any significant disparity between the University's academic policies and procedures and those of the partner institutions.

5.5. The Board monitors the quality of courses that have been accredited or approved.

Course and subject approval

5.6. When making decisions on the approval of a new or changes to an existing course or subject, the Board considers the advice and endorsement of the relevant Board committee.

5.7. When making decisions on the approval of a course proposal that involves delivery of the course through a partnership with a third party, the Board considers:

(a)   the capability and capacity of the partner to deliver the course to achieve the same learning outcomes as when or if the course is offered directly by the University;

(b)   the practicality of course closure and teach out arrangements; and

(c)    regulatory compliance requirements in accordance with the delivery location of the course.

New courses

5.8. New course proposals must be developed and submitted to the Academic Secretary in accordance with this policy and the rules published on CAMP.

5.9. Proposals for the following courses are submitted as new course proposals even where they include courses already approved by the Board:

(a)   combined/double or sequential courses;

(b)   shared courses;

(c)    joint coursework or joint research courses; and

(d)   dual courses.

Major course changes

5.10. Major course changes must be developed and submitted in accordance with this policy and the instructions published by the Board on CAMP.

5.11. A major course change involves any of the changes to a program, where ‘program’ is defined as a course, stream, major, or specialisation as detailed on CAMP. 

Minor course changes

5.12. Minor changes are defined on the Board’s CAMP website.

5.13. Deans may authorise minor changes to courses, programs and subjects when made in a timely manner as detailed on CAMP.

5.14. Changes made by the dean must be reported to the Board in accordance with the rules on CAMP. 

Late changes

5.15. Late changes are defined on the Board’s CAMP website. Deans may authorise late changes to courses, programs and subjects when made in a timely manner as detailed on CAMP.

Breadth approval

5.16. The dean approves subjects which can be taken as breadth in bachelor degree courses they are responsible for, except for University Breadth Subjects (UBS).

5.17. Breadth tracks are made and changed by the relevant dean. 

Course suspensions

5.18. Course suspensions

(a)   must be approved by the Board; and

(b)   may only be suspended for a period of one year at a time; and

(c)    any further suspension requires further Board approval.

Entry requirements

5.19. The Board approves entry requirements, including any changes to requirements, via the course accreditation instrument.

Subject quotas

5.20. Where a subject quota requires the approval of the President, the request for approval must be submitted through the subject approval instrument. 

Professional accreditation of courses

5.21. The relevant dean must manage the professional accreditation process (where courses require professional accreditation by external bodies to allow graduates admission to practise or admission to a professional association).

5.22. Deans must submit professional accreditation reports to the Board on request of the Academic Secretary.

5.23. The dean must include details of professional accreditations in the:

(a)   course approval instrument for relevant courses; and

(b)   AHEGS statement for the course.

Publication of course and subject details in the Handbook

5.24. The Academic Registrar publishes the details of courses and subjects prescribed by the Board in the Handbook. The term ‘the Handbook’ can only be used to describe the official University-wide publication.

5.25. The details of courses and subjects may not be altered or added to without Board approval after they have been approved for publication. 

Compliance monitoring of coursework subjects and courses

5.26. The Board audits and reviews courses and subjects at least every 7 years to ensure that they comply with Board policy.

5.27. The Board may investigate any matters of compliance brought to its attention at any time.

5.28. The Board may direct deans to make changes to subjects or courses as appropriate at any time to ensure compliance with policy.

Course with low enrolments

5.29. Where a course has had low enrolments for one year, it is reviewed by the relevant dean. Any resulting changes or discontinuation of the course must be undertaken in accordance with this policy and the instructions on the CAMP website.

Discontinuation and teaching out of courses and programs and teach-out plans

5.30. The Board approves the discontinuation and teaching out of courses and academic programs on advice from the relevant Board committee

5.31. Proposals to discontinue a course must include a teach-out plan where there are current enrolments.

5.32. In the case of cross-faculty double/combined courses, each dean must approve the discontinuation and must submit the required information concerning their respective components within a combined teach-out plan.

5.33. The teach-out plan must:

(a)   detail the core and elective elements that will be offered over the period of teach-out;

(b)   indicate how the integrity of the course/academic program will be maintained and its objectives met during the teach-out;

(c)    detail the implications for student progress in the course/academic program;

(d)   include a teach-out timetable indicating the core and elective elements that will be offered over the period of teach-out; and

(e)   in the case of cross-faculty courses/academic programs, each dean must submit a plan about their component in a combined teach-out plan.

5.34. Students in discontinued courses:

(a)   remain subject to the expected course duration and progress rules for the course; and

(b)   can complete that course provided they make satisfactory progress, including all compulsory elements and any requirements necessary for professional accreditation.

Professional placement subjects

5.35. Prior to facilitating or offering a professional placement activity, the dean must confirm that the activity complies with the Fair Work Act, using the directions set out in the professional placement process and guidelines.

5.36. The dean must appoint a placement co-ordinator to manage professional placements.

5.37. The placement co-ordinator must provide the following to the student and the host supervisor before the placement commences:

(a)   the subject outline, where the professional placement forms a mandatory part or all of a subject;

(b)   the course outline, where the professional placement forms a mandatory part or all of a course;

(c)    details of how the professional placement’s relationship to the subject and course learning outcomes and whether the professional placement is a requirement for relevant professional accreditation;

(d)   the aims, objectives and learning outcomes of the professional placement, specifying the essential and desirable experiences and associated learning/development to be achieved by the end of the professional placement;

(e)   details of how the professional placement will be assessed;

(f)     the assessment criteria, components and timing of assessment;

(g)    the University’s expectations of the host supervisor, placement coordinator and student regarding the conduct of the professional placement; and

(h)   processes for dealing with absences, conflict, misconduct or other difficulties encountered during the placement, including breakdown of the professional placement due to student performance or other circumstances.

5.38. Deans must regularly review their professional placement subjects, and courses with off-campus placement components, to ensure compliance with this policy, and University processes and guidelines.

5.39. The dean must ensure that student performance and conduct is monitored during professional placements. Students undertaking placements remain subject to the Academic Progress Review Policy, the Student Academic Integrity Policy and the Student Conduct Policy.

5.40. Deans must provide reasonable accommodations for students with disabilities to complete professional placement requirements for courses in agreement with the host supervisor.

5.41. Students who require adjustments to be made must formally disclose their disability prior to the allocation of a professional placement and consent to the release of necessary information to placement organisation staff for the purposes of making adjustments where the adjustment are reasonable and do not conflict with core participation requirements.

5.42. Supervisors of students undertaking a professional placement must be a professional in the relevant field with at least two years’ professional experience, or a designated individual supervisor of equivalent clinical/professional/industrial experience.

5.43. Where a professional placement is unable to continue due to matters relating to the host organisation, the placement coordinator must consult with the course coordinator and endeavour to:

(a)   provide an alternative professional placement for the student; and

(b)   determine the length of the alternative professional placement required to satisfy placement requirements for the course.

5.44. The University and the host organisation have a right to refuse a professional placement if either considers that there is a danger to the student, workers or clients of the host organisation.

Adding student achievements to the academic transcript and AHEGS

5.45. Deans wishing to add or remove student achievements on the academic transcript and AHEGS must submit a proposal to the Academic Secretary, in the format included in the instructions on CAMP. 

Issuing of additional academic transcripts, AHEGS and testamurs

5.46. The following information is included on the academic transcript, where relevant:

(a)   student ID number;

(b)   full name of student as recorded in the student system (family name, first given name, other given names, preferred honorific if recorded);

(c)   student's preferred contact address;

(d)   date of issue;

(e)   completion and conferral summary (courses and dates);

(f)    thesis title (if applicable);

(g)   degree (award) title, as per the register of awards;

(h)   the year(s)s of study for each degree (award);

(i)    subject code(s) and title(s);

(j)    disciplines (for graduate research candidates);

(k)   course précis (for courses with supervised practicum placements);

(l)    credit point value for each subject;

(m)  mark attained for each subject;

(n)   grade attained for each subject;

(o)   description of the University grading scheme, on the reverse side of each page;

(p)   overall honours grade or distinction (if applicable);

(q)   majors (if applicable);

(r)    scholarships, prizes, awards and other student achievements approved for inclusion, and date awarded (if applicable);

(s)   for Masters (Extended) courses, the statement “This  award is recognised within the Australian Qualifications Framework as a level 9 Masters (Extended) Degree”;

(t)   advanced standing (credit) granted (if applicable);

(u)  leave of absence start and return dates (if applicable);

(v)  lapsed candidature (if applicable, for graduate research candidates); and

(w) signature of the Academic Registrar.

5.47. Academic transcripts, AHEGS, testamurs and other forms of documentation certifying student enrolment and achievement are issued in accordance with the Privacy and Data Protection Act 2014 (Vic) and the Freedom of Information Act 1982 (Vic).

5.48. The Academic Registrar issues academic transcripts, AHEGS, testamurs and other forms of certification of student enrolment and achievement:

(a)   directly to the student to whom they relate; or

(b)   with the express written consent of the student, to a third party, including external professional or regulatory bodies (other than Centrelink, which is an exception under law).

Review of Course and Subject delivery

5.49. The Board undertakes regular reviews and evaluations of courses, at least every seven years, for quality assurance and to promote continuous improvement. The Academic Secretary publishes the schedule and the rules for the reviews on the Board’s website.

5.50. The reviews and evaluations aim to:

(a)   review the design and content of each course of study including:

i. the expected learning outcomes,

ii. the methods for assessment of those outcomes, and

iii. the extent of students’ achievement of learning outcomes,

(b)   recognise exemplary teaching and learning practices and seek ways to disseminate and encourage good practice;

(c)   be transparent;

(d)   serve both developmental and accountability purposes;

(e)   involve critical feedback to those involved in course delivery;

(f)    use external reference points wherever possible;

(g)   draw on multiple stakeholders as appropriate;

(h)   use multiple sources of information and data, including feedback from students;

(i)    recognise the value of different approaches to teaching and learning within different contexts;

(j)    cover all aspects of the delivery of the curriculum; and

(k)   invite evaluation and reflection by academic staff on the effects on student learning of curriculum design, teaching styles and approaches to assessment; and

(l)    take account of emerging developments in the field of education, modes of delivery, the changing needs of students and identified risks to the quality of the course of study.

5.51. The Board reviews and monitors subjects through the Subject Evaluation Survey (SES) instrument, developed by the Board for that purpose.

5.52. The SES is used to seek students’ perceptions of taught subjects in all teaching modes and locations. All taught subjects are surveyed in the teaching period in which they are offered except for subjects with fewer than 4 enrolments.

5.53. The administration of the SES and use of data collected from it protects respondent confidentiality.

5.54. The Academic Secretary publishes the rules for implementation and use of the SES on the Board’s website.

6. Roles and responsibilities

Role/Decision/Action

Responsibility

Conditions and limitations

Approve course rules

Academic Board

Must meet relevant AQF requirements and standards and any strategic plans approved by Council

Approving courses and subjects

Academic Board

 

Develop and submit  course and subject proposals

Dean of relevant faculty or person authorised by the dean to act

Must be in accordance with Board policy

Approve course discontinuations and teach-out plans

Academic Board

 

Waiver of completion requirements for a degree

President, Academic Board

Must be in accordance with this policy and excludes some courses

Certify course completion

Dean of relevant faculty or person authorised by the dean to act

 

Correction of errors in course completion

President, Academic Board

 

Approve subject quotas including the imposition of a quota or decrease to a subject quota in undergraduate subjects that are compulsory in a course or cores to a major

Academic Board or the President of the Board

 

 

Approve imposition, removal or change to subject quota

Dean of relevant faculty or person authorised by the dean to act

Excludes quotas undergraduate subjects that are compulsory in a course or core to a major.

Review courses with low enrolments

Dean of relevant faculty or person authorised by the dean to act

 

Ensure that professional placement subjects comply with the Fair Work Act

Dean of relevant faculty or person authorised by the dean to act

 

Monitor compliance with this policy

Academic Board or committee of the academic Board

 

Publish course and subject approval rules

Academic Secretary

 

Regularly review courses

Academic Board or committee of the Academic Board

 

Regularly reviews and monitor subjects

Academic Board or committee of the Academic Board

 

Report on all changes made to subjects and courses annually

Dean of relevant faculty

Report provided to the Academic Secretary

7. Definitions

“accreditation instrument” means the form of approving a course or subject approved by the Board from time to time

“articulation (articulated courses)” means movement between qualifications, where the completion of one award allows movement into another with advanced standing and credit in a defined pathway.

“Australian Qualifications Framework (AQF)” is the national policy for regulated qualifications in Australian education and training. It provides the standards for Australian qualifications.

“award/award course” means a program of study formally approved/accredited by the University which leads to an academic award granted by the University. This is a degree, diploma or certificate approved by the Academic Board which may be conferred or granted by Council.

“Board” means the Academic Board of the University of Melbourne.

“breadth” means a component of a bachelor degree comprising subject drawn from areas of study outside those offered within the core component of the degree.

“breadth track” means a coherent group of three or more subjects (including at least one subject at level 2 or higher) that progressively develops knowledge and skills relevant to a particular domain, theme, topic or issue. Breadth Tracks may be in a single discipline, or multi-disciplinary or inter-disciplinary (some Breadth Tracks include subjects that are not available as Breadth in all New Generation degrees). A list of Breadth Tracks is available in the handbook.

“bridging study” means one or more subjects undertaken on a non-award basis by an overseas trained professional seeking to meet the formal requirements for entry into their profession in Australia. An Assessment Statement from the relevant professional body, recognised by the Department of Industry, Innovation, Science, Research and Tertiary Education (DIISRTE), is required to classify study as bridging study.

“capstone” means a subject designed to allow a student to demonstrate the application of knowledge and skills to plan and execute a substantial research based project, capstone experience or piece of scholarship. It is taken towards the end of the course. It requires students to consolidate and integrate the work undertaken in their major, specialisation or course.

“Community Access Program (CAP)” means a program allowing a person to enrol in one or more individual subjects (in assessed or non-assessed mode) on a non-award basis; also known as 'single subject study'.

“compulsory subject” means a subject required for completion of the course.

“concurrent diploma” means an award course, involving study equivalent in depth to an undergraduate major, which is undertaken concurrently with a Bachelor degree.

“contact hours” means hours in which a student is expected or required to be in attendance at classes (including lectures, tutorials, laboratory classes and field work) or undertaking the equivalent if the subject is delivered online.

“co-requisite” means a subject that must be taken in conjunction with another subject.

“core component” means subjects undertaken from within the broad discipline central to the degree. These may include compulsory and elective subjects.

“core subject” means a subject required for completion of a major or specialisation.

“Course Approvals and Management Procedures (CAMP)” means the rules and instructions approved by the Board and published by the Academic Secretary on the Board’s web pages, with information on the submission of course, program and subject proposals and related course matters.

“course” means an award or non-award course approved by the Board.

“course requirements” means the set of academic requirements (the core subjects) which are mandatory for completion of a course.

“coursework course” means a program of study leading to an award of the University that comprises more than one-third coursework. Coursework usually involves attendance at lectures, classes or seminars and may have a research component comprising less than two thirds of the program.

“creative work” means performance, musical composition, exhibition, writing (poetry, fiction, script or other written literary forms), design, film, video, multimedia or other new media technologies and modes of presentation.

“credit points” means an allocated number (usually 12.5 or multiples thereof) that represents the size of the subject, its workload and its contribution to meeting the requirements of a course.

“cross-credit” means a subject taken towards one award course is also included in the credit points required for a second award.

“department” means teaching department.

“disallowed subject combination” means a combination of subjects that students are not permitted to enrol in and receive credit for, normally because the content of the subjects overlaps significantly.

“dual course” means where two qualifications of the same type are completed at the University and another higher education provider (most commonly an overseas provider as a form of Transnational Education) with formal pre-approved cross-credit arrangements, enabling completion of both qualifications in less than the minimum time required to complete each qualification separately.

“elective” means a subject within the broad discipline central to either the degree or major, from which students may choose a specified number.

“enabling study” means one or more subjects undertaken on a non-award basis to qualify a student to apply for an award course. Study undertaken on an enabling basis cannot subsequently be credited towards the award course for which it is a qualifying pathway.

“expected course duration” means the expected time for completion of a course expressed in full-time years.

“faculty” means a faculty or a graduate school established as a faculty, and in this policy it also means the School of Melbourne Custom Programs.

“foundation studies” means non-award programs specifically approved by the Academic Board as pathways into award courses.

“full-time course” means a course in which students are not normally permitted to enrol part-time.

Handbookthe official University repository for all current course and subject information, published by the Academic Registrar.

“honours program” means a 100 credit point program of study at the fourth year level following a 300 point bachelor degree, successful completion of which leads to a bachelor honours degree.

“host organisation” means an organisation, institution or other employer that is not the University of Melbourne at which a student undertakes a professional placement or volunteer activity.

“host supervisor” means an employee of the host organisation responsible, in part or in whole, for supervising student(s) undertaking a professional placement or volunteer activity.

“joint coursework course” means a single course of study developed, designed, delivered co-operatively by more than one institution and resulting in a single award.

“late change” means a change to a subject requiring amendment of information that has been published in the University Handbook for the current or forthcoming year, and/or has been reported by the University to the relevant Commonwealth department.

“learning outcomes” means the expression of a set of knowledge, skills and the application of the knowledge and skills a person has acquired and is able to demonstrate as a result of learning.

“major” means a defined sequence of subjects chosen to provide depth of study within a specific subject area.

“major change” means particular changes to a course, stream, major, specialisation, or a University Breadth Subject which requires approval of the Board.

“maximum time to complete” means the maximum time allowed for completion of a course including full/part-time enrolment, leave of absence, other gaps in enrolment and credit.

“minor” means a defined sequence of subjects within an award course, generally comprising fewer points than a major.

“minor change” means particular changes to a course, stream, major, specialisation, or a particular change to a University Breadth Subject which the Board has authorised a dean to make.

“nested program” means a sequence of award courses that form stages in the highest available award. Each stage may operate as an entry and exit point, and encompass more than one AQF qualification level and/or qualification type/and/or education and training sector.

“non-award” study or course means study of one or more subjects which are accredited by the Academic Board (and may or may not also be offered as part of an award course), which does not lead to an award of the University. Such subjects may be able to be counted as credit towards an award course on successful completion, or may be used to meet the entry requirements for a course at the University on successful completion.

“part-time course” means a course in which students are permitted to enrol part time.

“teach-out course” means a course that no longer accepts new enrolments, but the delivery of the course continues until all students enrolled in it have completed the requirements of the course (subject to course duration requirements).

“teach-out plan” means a detailed plan explaining how the course or program discontinuation will be managed and the impact on enrolled students minimised.

“points” means credit points.

“prerequisite” means required prior knowledge, usually expressed in terms of a subject or subjects that must be completed before enrolment in another subject.

“professional accreditation” means the accreditation of a course by a professional body which allows graduates of the course to be admitted to practice and/or admission to membership of, or association with, the professional body.

“professional placement” means a workplace placement undertaken by a student with a host organisation as a compulsory requirement of a subject or course of the University.

“program” means a structured stream in a field of study or discipline within a course.

“research course/degree” means program of study leading to an award of the University that comprises a minimum of two thirds of research, research training and independent study.

“sequential degree” means the completion of two degrees at the same AQF qualification level in sequence.

“specialisation” means a sequence of study within a particular course that is intended to lead to particular academic or vocational outcomes.

“stream” means focussed study within a specific area intended to produce specific outcomes and can be used to mean either a combination of subjects:

(a)  giving students a qualification in a particular area of a degree course, often designed to satisfy requirements of a professional institute, e.g. civil engineering stream in Bachelor of Engineering course, building stream in Bachelor of Planning and Design course; or

(b)  defining different ways in which a student can meet the requirements of a course.

“subject” means a unit of academic work having a discrete designated code and title in which students enrol and complete specific work requirements, and, on completion of which the student is awarded a grade which appears on their academic record.

“subject code” means a unique subject identifier.

“subject co-ordinator” means an academic staff member with overall responsibility for the planning and delivery of a subject.

 “thesis” means a dissertation embodying the results of original research, and, especially substantiating a specific view.

“University” means the University of Melbourne.

“University Breadth Subject” (UBS) is an interdisciplinary subject taught collaboratively by different teaching departments in different faculties examining issues from multiple perspectives.

“vocational placement” means a placement undertaken by a student with a host organisation as a compulsory or elective component of a subject or course of the University. In some faculties, this may be described as a 'vocational placement', an 'internship', 'work experience', a 'studentship' or 'industry-based learning'.

POLICY APPROVER

Academic Board

POLICY STEWARD

Academic Secretary

REVIEW

This policy is to be reviewed by 20 July 2021.

VERSION HISTORY

Version Approved By Approval Date Effective Date Sections Modified
1 President, Academic Board 20 Jul 2016 21 Jul 2016 New version arising from the Policy Consolidation Project.
2 President, Academic Board 29 Jul 2016 5 Aug 2016 Minor corrections throughout to correct internal referencing and formatting errors. Corrections to 4.28, 4.8, 4.41, 4.70 to clarify work experience equivalences. 4.6(f) insertion of "includes". 4.103 includion of "must" to clarify progression rules. 5.2(g) correction to mapping requirements.
3 President, Academic Board 1 Sep 2016 1 Sep 2016 Minor correction to 4.52 and 4.57(c).
4 President, Academic Board 12 Oct 2016 31 Oct 2016 Minor amendment to section 4.57(d).
5 President, Academic Board 15 Nov 2016 15 Nov 2016 New section 4.46 to clarify 4.45(b). New section 4.54 to clarify 4.53(b). Consequential renumbering of rest of section 4.
6 Academic Secretary 6 Dec 2016 6 Dec 2016 Editorial amendment to s5.39, inserting correct reference to Student Conduct Policy (MPF1324).
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